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Die Antwoord was insane, and apparently the bass was too much for my phone camera to deal with

lamus-dworski:

1944 Warsaw Uprising [outside Poland often mistaken with the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising which took place a year earlier, in 1943] - the major World War II operation held by the Polish resistance Home Army (in Polish: Armia Krajowa, AK), a tragic 63-day struggle to liberate the Polish capital city from the Nazi Germany, undertaken at the time when the Allied troops were breaking through the Normandy defenses and the Red Army, following the instructions gave by Stalin to cut off the Polish insurgents from the outside help, was stationed at-hold at the other bank of the Vistula River, 20 km from Warsaw.

The massive losses, counted to around 150,000 - 200,000 deaths (mostly civillians killed in mass executions), 600,000 - 650,000 expelled people (of whom around 150,000 sent to Nazi/German labour and concentration camps) and c. 93% of the city left in ruins, make it one of the largest battles fought by ill-equipped combatants and civillians, result of the Nazi Germany planned destruction of Warsaw.

Operated by the Polish resistance army and being remembered as a struggle of the hundreds of thousands inhabitants of the Polish capital city, the Warsaw Uprising was a heroic fight of the Poles but not of the Poles only. Numerous representatives of other nationalities had joined the Polish units in the name of the old Polish motto: “for our freedom and yours. Among them were foreigners living in Warsaw before the war, single soldiers escaped from the POW camps, refugees from the forced labour in Germany, even a few deserters from the Nazi and Soviet armies. Of the well-documented, the most numerous were Slovak, Hungarian and French volunteers, few Belgian, Dutch, Greek, British and Italian people, one Romanian, one Australian and one Nigerian. Vast majority of the 348 Jews deported from the Netherlands, Greece, Germany and Hungary, who had been held in “Gęsiówka" (the Nazi/German concentration camp at the Gęsia street in Warsaw), joined the Home Army as well after being liberated by the Polish insurgents. Slovaks forming the Platoon 535 were the only foreigners entitled to fight under their own banner and uniforms, as the organization collaborating with the Home Army since 1942, long before the outbreak of the Uprising [x].

Informative websites:

All pictures via Wikimedia Commons.

hellopoland:

Warszawa, PL

hellopoland:

Warszawa, PL

allthingseurope:

Warsaw, Poland
via

allthingseurope:

Warsaw, Poland

via

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majewskaphotography:

Christmas 2013, Warsaw, Poland.

majewskaphotography:

Christmas 2013, Warsaw, Poland.

majewskaphotography:

Christmas 2013, Warsaw, Poland.

historia-polski:

"The Royal Baths (Łazienki Królewskie), a residence of king Stanislaw August Poniatowski, is one of the most beautiful 18th-century park-and-palace complexes in Europe. Warsaw’s famous landmark, it attracts the visitors with its classic architecture and the soothing green of the park.

The name of the residence comes the Lubomirski family’s summer baths which existed on the area in the late 17th century.

In 1764, the property was purchased by Stanislaw August, who hired the best architects at that time, such as Domenico Merlin, and filled the forest with marvellous classicist buildings. The Palace on the Water (Pałac na Wodzie) was the venue of thriving cultural and artistic life of the Polish Enlightenment. ‘King Stas’, himself a great patron of the arts, invited the most distinguished artist to his famous ‘Thursday dinners’.

Located in the downtown area of the Polish capital, the Royal Baths are a popular tourist destination and a beloved walking area for the Warsovians. The visitors are enchanted by the rich interior ornaments of the palace, its reflection on the surface of the pond, and the amphitheatre on the water. They cannot miss a walk in the park, which remains uniquely beautiful throughout all seasons of the year.

Especially in summertime, a lot of attractions may be expected, such as concerts amidst a sea of flowers in front of Fryderyk (Frédéric) Chopin’s monument, a meeting with stately peacocks, a gondola trip across the pond, or an opportunity to feed squirrels.

The park’s Old Orangery (Stara Pomaranczarnia), full of exotic trees and statues, hosts the country’s largest Polish Sculpture Gallery.” (source)

fot: Mariusz Cieszewski

aestheticgoddess:

Warsaw, Poland 1969

aestheticgoddess:

Warsaw, Poland 1969