I II III

detailsofpaintings:

Anna Bilińska-Bohdanowicz, Self-Portrait (unfinished) (details)

1892

lamus-dworski:

Warsaw city in c. 1880, from an album “Widoki Warszawy” (“Views of Warsaw”). According to the description most of the photographs were taken by Konrad Brandel [via Mazowiecka Biblioteka Cyfrowa]. Part 8/11 » Widoki Warszawy tag.

lamus-dworski:

Polish barding decorations, 17th century, from: Auguste Racinet “Le costume historique. (…)” vol.6 (1888).

lamus-dworski:

Polish barding decorations, 17th century, from: Auguste Racinet “Le costume historique. (…)” vol.6 (1888).

allthingseurope:

Jelenia Gora, Poland (by Andras Jancsik)

allthingseurope:

Jelenia Gora, Poland (by Andras Jancsik)

Die Antwoord was insane, and apparently the bass was too much for my phone camera to deal with

thepolishstufflove:


Stanisław Józef Rejchan (Polish,1858-1919)

thepolishstufflove:

Stanisław Józef Rejchan (Polish,1858-1919)

lamus-dworski:

1944 Warsaw Uprising [outside Poland often mistaken with the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising which took place a year earlier, in 1943] - the major World War II operation held by the Polish resistance Home Army (in Polish: Armia Krajowa, AK), a tragic 63-day struggle to liberate the Polish capital city from the Nazi Germany, undertaken at the time when the Allied troops were breaking through the Normandy defenses and the Red Army, following the instructions gave by Stalin to cut off the Polish insurgents from the outside help, was stationed at-hold at the other bank of the Vistula River, 20 km from Warsaw.

The massive losses, counted to around 150,000 - 200,000 deaths (mostly civillians killed in mass executions), 600,000 - 650,000 expelled people (of whom around 150,000 sent to Nazi/German labour and concentration camps) and c. 93% of the city left in ruins, make it one of the largest battles fought by ill-equipped combatants and civillians, result of the Nazi Germany planned destruction of Warsaw.

Operated by the Polish resistance army and being remembered as a struggle of the hundreds of thousands inhabitants of the Polish capital city, the Warsaw Uprising was a heroic fight of the Poles but not of the Poles only. Numerous representatives of other nationalities had joined the Polish units in the name of the old Polish motto: “for our freedom and yours. Among them were foreigners living in Warsaw before the war, single soldiers escaped from the POW camps, refugees from the forced labour in Germany, even a few deserters from the Nazi and Soviet armies. Of the well-documented, the most numerous were Slovak, Hungarian and French volunteers, few Belgian, Dutch, Greek, British and Italian people, one Romanian, one Australian and one Nigerian. Vast majority of the 348 Jews deported from the Netherlands, Greece, Germany and Hungary, who had been held in “Gęsiówka" (the Nazi/German concentration camp at the Gęsia street in Warsaw), joined the Home Army as well after being liberated by the Polish insurgents. Slovaks forming the Platoon 535 were the only foreigners entitled to fight under their own banner and uniforms, as the organization collaborating with the Home Army since 1942, long before the outbreak of the Uprising [x].

Informative websites:

All pictures via Wikimedia Commons.

ritasv:

GNIEW-25 by Bartosz Borowski

ritasv:

GNIEW-25 by Bartosz Borowski

iuvencula:

Girls Wearing Traditional Polish Outfits by włodi on Flickr.

iuvencula:

Girls Wearing Traditional Polish Outfits by włodi on Flickr.