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The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)

marthajefferson:

The Golden Gauntlet, Henri III of France’s armour (details), c.1550

marthajefferson:

The Golden Gauntlet, Henri III of France’s armour (details), c.1550

mventus:

Oren Eliav - Collar

mventus:

Oren Eliav - Collar

jeannepompadour:

Illuminations from the “Gradual de Santa Maria degli Angeli” by Silvestro dei Gherarducci, c. 1370

smithsonianlibraries:

We close pollinator week with this animated tribute to the bees, bugs, birds, bats, and others who make life a little sweeter.
Original from Maria Sibylla Merian’s Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung und sonderbare Blumennahrung , 1730

smithsonianlibraries:

We close pollinator week with this animated tribute to the bees, bugs, birds, bats, and others who make life a little sweeter.

Original from Maria Sibylla Merian’s Raupen wunderbare Verwandelung und sonderbare Blumennahrung , 1730

choomathy:

this series was fun. I remember my tutor tried to get all “damn girl I love your work with feminism what a deep concept” and I was like nah I just like baths and … nipples

Chloe Killip 2013.

marie-duplessis:

Winterhalter, Hermann 
detail from Cécile Charlotte Furtado-Heine

marie-duplessis:

Winterhalter, Hermann 

detail from Cécile Charlotte Furtado-Heine

lamus-dworski:

Gustaw Pillati “Typy Polskie”, litografie, 1928.